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​Moscow Institute of Architecture: projects by Vsevolod Medvedev group

In this issue, we are reviewing the diploma projects of a group of bachelors from Moscow Architectural Institute working under the leadership of Vsevolod Medvedev, Mikhail Kanunnikov and Elizaveta Medvedeva.

28 October 2020
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Below, we are reviewing the project by the bachelors of the “Prom” department, developed during the lockdown, presented in the spring of 2020, and selected, according to our tradition, by the students’ architectural advisers. The curators of the group were Vsevolod Medvedev, Mikhail Kanunnikov, and Elizaveta Medvedeva.

author photo

Vsevolod Medvedev, 4izmerenie

This year, a group of bachelors graduated from Moscow Institute of Architecture. For the first time in history, a large part of the design process and the presentations took place remotely. This was quite a challenge, both for us and for our students. Unfortunately, the institute was unable to organize videoconferences for the defense of thesis projects, and all works were accepted virtually without any authors’ comments. I cannot quite get what it has to do with – maybe, our obsolete technical base or the conservative policy of our management. Moscow Institute of Architecture, just like many other creative higher educational institutions in this country, turned out to be unable to tackle such a challenge as the COVID-19 pandemic. However, despite the lack of live meetings and discussions, the projects have a high level of elaboration and are in no way inferior to the works of their predecessors.

The choice of the topic of the project is not limited to a single concept. The students chose the direction independently, based on their personal interests and issues that they wanted to address. The scope of topics was quite diverse: from small-scale projects amidst dense city construction to grand-scale planning solutions on the territories of Russia, Europe, and the USA.

We tried not to impose our opinion, but to support and help develop individual innovative ideas. It was important to create a meaningful architectural design based on preliminary research and solving the identified problems. Most of the students’ time, however, was still devoted to developing architectural and imagery solutions. Interesting research became an excellent basis for further creativity, which eventually led to non-standard approaches, and this is the most important thing.

Creative ideas, individuality, and the ability to think out of the box is something that we have been trying to foster in our students for years. As always, we are happy with the result. The whole group is characterized by a unique architectural vision, the ability to defend their point of view and a serious attitude to the profession.


The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
Evgenia Chumachenko

In addition to the cultural and educational archaeology center, situated in the Crimea, this project offers an example of developing public city spaces.

The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko


“Archaeological research can be likened to studying tree rings, by which you can trace the growth, the history, and the development of a tree. With each new epoch, architecture and culture pile up new layers – something new comes around, but the old images and features linger on. The growth rings contain a lot of information; from their thickness and size one can judge about all the significant events that occurred during the tree’s life. It is this specific feature that is used as the basis for the town planning concept of the research and development institute.

The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko


The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko


The master plan of the land site is based on concentric growth rings – simple and complex architectural forms that reflect the evolution process that has been going for centuries in this city and this area. The rings are reflected in the structure of the pedestrian and cycling routes, by which one can go across the entire territory of the complex. Thanks to the rings formed on the master plan, one can single out the main plaza and divide the territory into zones: the institute, the museum, the residential part, and the pavilions, in which models of archaeological monuments are made.

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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman. Archaeological monuments in the southern part of the Crimea
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman. Location plan
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko


In addition to the tree rings, the age layers overlap, forming a “gradient of time” – the older matter lies deeper, while things that are newer lie closer to the surface. The gradient manifests itself in the town planning solution, helping to uncover the space. From the railroad side, the construction is denser; it gets sparser as we move towards the river, alternating with extended recreation areas.

The axis composition is meant to help people perceive the main cultural points of the city – the Kalamitu Fortress, the “cave town” on the Zagaitinskaya Cliff, and Chertova Balka. The main axis also includes the towers of the “ethno-center”, each of which symbolizes the cultures of people that lived on this land at different times. The second axis includes the complex of the museum and the institute.

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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman. The standard plan of a residential building
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman. Section view 1-1
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman. Section view 2-2
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko
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    The complex of Research and Development Institute of Archaeology in the city of Inkerman
    Copyright: © Evgenia Chumachenko


The institute itself is an elongated complex of three buildings, which are lined up along the second town planning axis, starting from the museum and ending in the second unit of the institute. The building of the museum was devised as an arch system that gradually “disintegrates”, bleeding into decorative columns in front of the museum building, and then into a bridge, visually connecting the museum from one bank of the river to the museum part in the institute. The facade of the main institute building also consists of arches that work not only on the facade but inside the building as well.

The project of the Research and Development Institute of Archaeology will become a large tourist and scientific center of the Crimean peninsula that will attract students and tourists alike. The complex is meant to liven up this land and improve the overall scientific and cultural standards in this area.”

The Moscow Film Laboratory
Anna Vorobyeva


“The goal of the project is to support and stimulate the development of cinematography by creating an experimental film laboratory – a place where new formats are created for further promotion and high-quality screening of films.

The Moscow Film Laboratory
Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva


The project will be hosted in the already existing Gorky Film Studio that is situated next to an important center of city activity – the VDKKh park. Such a location makes it possible to reconsider the attitude of the film studio towards the city, at the same time creating a center that is all about the openness of the whole process of movie making, conveying the essence of experimental cinema.

The Moscow Film Laboratory
Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva


The Moscow Film Laboratory
Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva


To develop cinematography, you need to search for new facets of your creative activity, and you need to experiment. Therefore, the basis of the project is the environment capable of adapting to any needs of the creative process: format, attitude towards the viewer, various collaborations, etc. Creating something new and yet-unknown does not have criteria that can be applied to designing habitual structures, therefore, use scenarios are supported by different types of transformations for each of the stages in the life of the new cinema format in the laboratory. The stages correspond to functions: educational, production, and public, all of them complementing each other and providing the resources; at the intersection of the functions, the Experiment begins.

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    The Moscow Film Laboratory. The auditorium
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory. The location
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory. The context
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory. Eductation, experiments, exhibitions, professional work
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva


1 . The creation stage. The “Tower” educational center

The towers consist of independent studios that are arranged in accordance with the stages of filmmaking. Each studio has a floor of its own. There is also a “universal floor”, a transformable space with boundless possibilities for lighting adjustments.

2 . The testing stage. A practicing space: the “Curtain Labyrinth”.

This is the core of the experiment, where the spaces are formed by curtains, or, should a noise-proof environment be needed, by partitions of cylindrical modules, which move from the first level to the second on guides.

3 . The application stage. The production complex “filmmaking promenade”.

The floors move on guides, opening backlots, widening the filming spaces, and forming the “Movie Promenade”. This is a walking area that consists of various fragments; like spectators, people move along the line of changing frames. This is a route where you edit a cultural space of your own, which will always have different scripts or action scenarios depending on the specific activity of the studio.

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    The Moscow Film Laboratory
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory. The structure
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory. The structure
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory. The structure
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory. Education
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva
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    The Moscow Film Laboratory. Education
    Copyright: © Anna Vorobyeva


4 . The movie's premier stage. The “FINISH PAVILION” auditorium.

The main public part of the complex is the auditorium adjoining the preexisting building. The auditorium can be adjusted to fit any specific format. The floor space is occupied by lifting and lowering platforms, and the outer walls open onto the festival square with a pedestrian bridge connecting the public space with the core of the educational center.”

The center for mental health in Moscow.
Yana Kurilova


“The modern world is rapidly developing, constantly changing things that we have grown used to. We live in a stressful environment. Every day the number of people with mental disorders is growing, including in Russia. The project offers a look at how new digital technologies, contextual design and architectural solutions can help society in the area of mental health viewed in the context of this crisis.

The center for mental health in Moscow
Copyright: © Yana Kurilova


The mental health center operates based on a restorative approach. Most of the attention is paid to the employment of the rehabilitant and finding their strengths or talents, and not their illness and psychopathology. This approach builds self-confidence through self-help and self-reliance.

The center for mental health in Moscow
Copyright: © Yana Kurilova


A special program will help to bridge the gap that is there in treatment methodology between diagnostics and urgent help or medication in-hospital treatment. It will also make checking one’s mental health more affordable for everyone. Also, this project can be considered as the basis of a design guide, which offers a possible alternative to urban mental health care in Russia.

The center for mental health in Moscow
Copyright: © Yana Kurilova


The center is regarded as a testing ground for programs that are largely lacking in the current mental healthcare system. These programs will raise community awareness of the level of mental disorders, provide early diagnosis, and support mental health recovery.

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    The center for mental health in Moscow
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova
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    The center for mental health in Moscow
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova
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    Mental Health Center in Moscow
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova
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    The center for mental health in Moscow
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova
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    Mental Health Center in Moscow
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova
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    Mental Health Center in Moscow
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova
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    Mental Health Center in Moscow
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova
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    Mental Health Center in Moscow
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova
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    Mental Health Center in Moscow. Abandoned coach house converted into therapy studios
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova
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    The center for mental health in Moscow. Location plan
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova


The building is a single volume that connects and enshrouds all the other structures on the land site. The pitched roofs of the houses that make up the complex are meant to evoke the traditional image of Home. The corrugated roof gives all the buildings certain lightness and unites all the blocks into a single whole. It also helps to solve the issues with lighting and possible overheating of the building; some of its parts conceal the utility lines.”

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    The center for mental health in Moscow
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova
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    Mental Health Center in Moscow
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova
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    Mental Health Center in Moscow
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova
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    The center for mental health in Moscow
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova
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    Mental Health Center in Moscow
    Copyright: © Yana Kurilova


“Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment.
Denis Omelchenko


“The center is situated in Saint Petersburg, in the estuary of the Smolenka River on the Morskaya Embankment of the Vasilyevsky Island. The name of the center was determined by the historical past of the river. In the 18th century, the river had a well-established name of Mayakusha. In the first half of the 19th century, other names began to be used: Chernaya (“Black”) and Glukhaya (“Deaf”) rivers. In 1864, to eliminate confusion with the same name of another Chernaya River, it was named the Smolensk River after the nearby Smolensk Cemetery. Later on, the river got its current name.

“Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment
Copyright: © Denis Omelchenko


The Morskaya Embankment has had a pretty complicated history. For years, the city planned to build here Alla Pugacheva Theater, yet, even after three different architectural proposals were considered, the construction never did begin. Due to the difficulties in coordinating the construction of a theater in Saint Petersburg, the idea of building a theater has now been abandoned. It is difficult to say with certainty what is currently planned for this part of the city. The most realistic option is a recreation park. In this regard, in my project, I focus on the preservation of the natural landscape and recreation areas commanding beautiful views on the Morskaya Embankment.

“Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment
Copyright: © Denis Omelchenko


The “Mayakusha” center offers various educational programs, developed within the framework of extra education and meant for refresher courses for practicing artists, designers, and other creative groups.

The main goals of the project are:
  • Integration of cutting-edge technologies into modern art and media entertainment;
  • Accessibility of informational and technical resources for creative activities thanks to specially equipped studios for doing various kinds of art and graphic design
  • Creating a “point of attraction” due to landscaping and creating an interactive space for recreation in the river’s estuary.

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    “Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment
    Copyright: © Denis Omelchenko
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    “Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment
    Copyright: © Denis Omelchenko
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    “Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment
    Copyright: © Denis Omelchenko
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    “Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment. Section view 1
    Copyright: © Denis Omelchenko
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    “Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment
    Copyright: © Denis Omelchenko
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    “Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment
    Copyright: © Denis Omelchenko


The territory of the center includes the project of a park, whose concept largely consists in the idea that intangible digital technologies can transform nature into art without harming it.

The Mayakusha Park is an interactive artistic space that changes due to people’s presence. It consists of overland and water-floating resonating lamps. If the wind blows or if somebody passes by such a lamp, it starts to glow and make sound. Light from one lamp is transmitted to neighboring ones, and so on until all the light passes through the entire mouth of the river. This light from the floating lamps transmits the same bright light to the ground lamps near trees and stones. When illuminated, the lamps emit a sound tone that matches a specific color. When the wind is not blowing and there are no people around, the lamps start to slowly go out.

The main pedestrian route leading to the center is the bridge that starts right next to the bus stop. The bridge features a small expo space for organizing art exhibitions in the warm season.

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    “Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment
    Copyright: © Denis Omelchenko
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    “Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment
    Copyright: © Denis Omelchenko
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    “Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment
    Copyright: © Denis Omelchenko
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    “Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment
    Copyright: © Denis Omelchenko
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    “Mayakusha”, the education and research center of integrating cutting-edge technologies in the area of modern art and media entertainment
    Copyright: © Denis Omelchenko


Also, the territory of Mayakusha includes an open-air exhibition hall. This space is designed for organizing temporary exhibitions and various events in the summertime (performances, happenings, etc.)

Sculpture Hall: a space for walking among permanently exhibited sculptures. Thanks to this concept of the entrance group, the cars that are driving by down the Korablestroitelei Street can see a very beautiful and unusual view opening up from the park. Still another place like this is situated next to the center, and is securely protected from the wind.”

An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
Lidia Kharcheva


“My diploma project is based on extensive research of the US suburbia, which identified problems that affect the quality of people’s life. The focus was on the Los Angeles suburbs and this is where I was looking for a site to design.

An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva


West Covina is located 30 km from downtown Los Angeles and is connected to it by a highway. The river that runs through the city and the highway that crosses it are problem areas. The fact that suburbia relies so much on the car traffic makes the territories lying alongside the highways the busiest ones, while the residential areas are empty and lifeless. The concrete river bed runs through the central part of the city; it is an exclusion zone that has a solely utilitarian function.

The land site which I chose for design is situated at the crossing of these two “arteries”, making it possible to employ both of them, creating a construction that would interact both with the city and the highway, and begin landscaping the riverside area.

An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva


Placing some of the projects above the highway and alongside it was conditioned by the planning structure of the suburbs, as well as by a need to create a high-profile project that would be read equally well by motorists and pedestrians alike in various parts of the city.

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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva


When I was considering the typology of the future construction, I saw my task in addressing such issues as construction monotony, lack of landmarks, lack of public spaces, parks, and lack of pedestrian connections. Vertical farming is becoming increasingly popular on a global scale. The ever-growing cities are consuming new territories, as more and more people leave the countryside. Traditional farming as we know it is dying out, and now it must adapt itself to the new reality. New methods of plant cultivation, such as aeroponics, hydroponics and aquaponics, allow you to get more crops in the shortest possible time, using several times less water, area, and manpower.

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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva
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    An urban agricultural complex in West Covina, USA
    Copyright: © Lidia Kharcheva


In the case of suburbia, the agricultural complex of such a type will boost the city’s activity and will draw an inflow of tourists, ensuring the autonomy of the surrounding area and providing jobs for the local residents, thus reducing the number of cars.

The complex has several functions: the public one with restaurants and a farmers market, the educational function with classrooms for schoolchildren and master class zones, and the research function with laboratories, while the main area will be occupied by cells for growing plants. Dividing the complex into cells gives city residents the opportunity to rent separate blocks for various purposes and simplifies their operation, as well as makes it possible to build similar centers in other places with the ability to change the configuration of their structure.” 

Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova


The existing buildings that are there on the territory of the former “Khimvolokno” plant are of no architectural value, but some of them are quite suitable for reconstruction, and can be remodeled to perform new and more relevant functions. Those buildings, which cannot be remodeled, will be taken down, and a bee art and technology park will be made here with a campus adjoining it.

Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova


I divided the technology park into six thematic areas corresponding to six arts, which I regard in the order of transition from visual and tactile to aural perception: 
  • Zone 1 – the zone of architecture and design (fully visual perception, and even tactile) – is situated in the very beginning of the park if we are to proceed from the management office building, which marks the compositional beginning of moving around the park.
  • Zone 2 is the zone of graphic art (visual perception with almost no tactile).
  • Zone 3 is the zone of filmmaking, theater, and photography (both visual and aural perception).
  • Zone 4 is the zone of literature and dramaturgy (which can be expressed both in images and words, yet words are used to describe an image, and this still refers to visual perception).
  • Zone 5 is the zone of choreography and acrobatics (visual and aural perception).
  • Zone 6 – the last and the main one, occupying the central location directly at the intersection of the two design axes – is the zone of music.

Why main? Because only music refers to pure aural perception! Only music is something that you can perceive without so much as a tiny image in your head, which is symbolic of triumph of mind over matter (if we are to conditionally assume that sound is something that does not physically exist, and an image always has a physical embodiment). Highlighting the music zone as the key one also resonates with the branding of the city of Klin, which is also based on aural perception (the city’s motto is “Klin... Sounds good!”)

Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova


The open-air music arena, designed in this area, can cater for 3000 people. The arena is elevated 45 meters above the ground; underneath the arena, there is a park with a swimming pool surrounding it. One can also get up to the arena by a spiral pedestrian ramp that circles it. Function-wise, this project may replace a classic city square.

Each of the six zones has everything that is necessary to study the art presented in it, and everything that you need to create, dreaming things up and making them a reality. I distinguish two types of spaces that are necessary to comprehend any of the existing talents.
  • The first type of spaces is meant for individual work on yourself and perfecting your skills, whatever they are. These spaces correspond to a square shape because, basically, what you need for studying or working is an adequately equipped square room with orthogonal walls, a floor, and a ceiling.
  • The second type of spaces is meant for communication / master classes / exhibitions / concerts. These spaces visually correspond to a circular shape because shows, lectures, or exhibitions lend themselves to more complex auditoriums: a circular exhibition, a round square, hemispheric arenas, and so on.

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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova


In my project, a typical building consists of multifunctional production studios, plugged in to water, sewage, and ventilation utility lines, which significantly widens the scope of activity in such a space. Also, the transformable partitions make it possible to join these studios together. In such rooms, you can make virtually any studio you may think of – a model studio, an art studio, or a mini workshop. The workshops are designed to cater for 300 people. Visually, the building and all the spaces inside of it have a square shape, which corresponds to the concept of form matching function.

A typical building of expo spaces includes different types of expo halls, including a 300-seat conference hall. Just like the studios, the expo spaces can be combined to form larger ones due to the removable partitions. According to the concept of the mutual dependence of form and function, the building and all the spaces in it have a round or ring shape.

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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova
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    Art and Technology park on the territory of the former synthetic fiber plan in the city of Klin
    Copyright: © Maria Cheltsova-Bebutova


28 October 2020

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Headlines now
​Dynamics of the Avenue
On Leningrad Avenue, not far away from the Sokol metro station, the construction of the A-Class business center Alcon II has been completed. ADM architects designed the main façade as three volumetric ribbons, as if the busy traffic of the avenue “shook” the matter sending large waves through it.
​Steamer at the Pier
An apartment hotel that looks like a ship with wide decks has been designed for a land plot on a lake shore in Moscow’s South Tushino. This “steamer” house, overlooking the lake and the river port, does indeed look as if it were ready to sail away.
The Magic of Rhythm or Ornament as a Theme
Designed by Sergey Tchoban, the housing complex Veren Place in St. Petersburg is the perfect example of inserting a new building into a historical city, and one the cases of implementing the strategy that the architect presented a few years ago in the book, which he coauthored with Vladimir Sedov, called “30:70. Architecture as a Balance of Forces”.
​Walking on Water
In the nearest future, the Marc Chagall Embankment will be turned into Moscow’s largest riverside park with green promenades, cycling and jogging trails, a spa center on water, a water garden, and sculptural pavilions designed in the spirit of the Russian avant-garde artists of the 1920, and, first of all, Chagall himself. In this issue, we are covering the second-stage project.
​Architectural Laboratory
A-Len has developed and patented the “Perfect Apartments” program, which totally eliminates “bad” apartment layouts. In this article, we are sharing how this program came around, what it is about, who can benefit from it, and how.
​“Architectural Archaeology of the Narkomfin Building”: the Recap
One of the most important events of 2020 has been the completion of the long-awaited restoration of the monument of Soviet avant-garde architecture – the Narkomfin Building, the progenitor of the typology of social housing in this country. The house retained its residential function as the main one, alongside with a number of artifacts and restoration clearances turned into living museum exhibits.
​LIFE on the Setun River
The area in the valley of the Setun River near the Vereiskaya Street got two new blocks of the “LIFE-Kutuzovsky” housing complex, designed by ADM architects. The two new blocks have a retail boulevard of their own, and a small riverside park.
​Celestial Tectonics
Three towers on a podium over the Ramenka River are the new dominant elements on the edge of a Soviet “microdistrict”. Their scale is quite modern: the height is 176 m – almost a skyscraper; the facades are made of glass and steel. Their graceful proportions are emphasized by a strict white grid, and the volumetric composition picks up the diagonal “grid of coordinates” that was once outlined in the southwest of Moscow by the architects of the 1970’s and 1980’s.
Clouds over the Railroad
In the stead of former warehouses near “Lyubertsy-1” station, a new housing complex has been built, which peacefully coexists with the railroad, with the flyover bridge, and with the diverse surrounding scenery, not only dominating over the latter, but improving it.
​Towers in a Forest
The authors of the housing complex “In the Heart of Pushkino” were faced with a difficult task: to preserve the already existing urban forest, at the same time building on it a compound of rather high density. This is how three towers at the edge of the forest appeared with highly developed public spaces in their podiums and graceful “tucks” in the crowning part of the 18-story volumes.
​The Towers of “Sputnik”
Six towers, which make up a large housing complex standing on the bank of the Moskva River at the very start of the Novorizhskoe Highway, provide the answers to a whole number of marketing requirements and meets a whole number of restrictions, offering a simple rhythm and a laconic formula for the houses that the developer preferred to see as “flashy”.
​The Starting Point
In this article, we are reviewing two retro projects: one is 20 years old, the other is 25. One of them is Saint Petersburg’s first-ever townhouse complex; the other became the first example of a high-end residential complex on Krestovsky Island. Both were designed and built by Evgeny Gerasimov and Partners.
The Path to New Ornamentation
The high-end residential complex “Aristocrat” situated next to a pine park at the start of the Rublev Highway presents a new stage of development of Moscow’s decorative historicist architecture: expensively decorated, yet largely based on light-colored tones, and masterfully using the romantic veneer of majolica inserts.
​Renovation: the Far East Style
The competition project of renovating two central city blocks of Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, developed by UNK project, won the nomination “Architectural and planning solutions of city construction”.
​The Contact
The Istituto Centrale per la Grafica in Rome presents Sergei Tchoban’s exhibition “Imprint of the future. Destiny of Piranesi’s City”. The exhibition includes four etchings, based on Roman architectural views of the XVIII century complemented by futuristic insertions, as well as a lot of drawings that investigate the same topic, at times quite expressively. The exhibition poses questions, but does not seem to give any answers. Since going to Rome is pretty problematic now, let’s at least examine the pictures.
​In Search of Visual Clarity
In this article, we are reviewing a discussion devoted to the question of designing city space elements, which is quite complicated for the Russian expanses of land. The discussion was organized by the Genplan Institute of Moscow at the ArchMoscow convention in Gostiny Dvor.
​The City of the Sun
Jointly designed by Sergey Tchoban and Vladimir Plotkin, the VTB Arena Park complex can arguably be considered the perfect experiment on solving the centuries-old controversy between traditional architecture and modernism. The framework of the design code, combined with the creative character of the plastique-based dialogue between the buildings, formed an all-but-perfect fragment of the city fabric.
​...The Other Was Just Railroad Gin*
In their project of the third stage of “Ligovsky City” housing complex, located in the industrial “gray” belt of Saint Petersburg, the KCAP & Orange Architects & A-Len consortium set before themselves a task of keeping up the genius loci by preserving the contours of the railroad and likening the volumes of residential buildings to railroad containers, stacked up at the goods unloading station.
​Lions on Glass
While reconstructing the facades of Building 4 of Moscow Hospital #23, SPEECH architects applied a technique, already known from Saint Petersburg projects by Sergey Tchoban – cassettes with elements of classical architecture printed on glass. The project was developed gratis, as a help to the hospital.
Park of Sentiments
The project of “Romantic Park Tuchkov Buyan”, which was developed by the consortium of Studio 44 and WEST 8, and has won an international competition, combines sculptural landscape design and wooden structures, variety of spatial features and an eventful agenda, designed for diverse audience, with a beautiful and complex passeist idea of a palace park, meant to evoke thoughts and feelings.
​Architecture as an Educational Tool
The concept of a charity school “Tochka Budushchego” (“Point of the Future”) in Irkutsk is based on cutting-edge educational programs, and is designed, among other things, for adapting orphaned children for independent life. An important role is played by the architecture of the building: its structure and different types of interconnected spaces.
​The Gallery Approach
In this article, we are covering the concept of a Central District Clinic for 240 patients, designed by Ginzburg Architects, which won at a competition organized by the Architects Union and the Healthcare Ministry.
Health Constructor
In this issue, we are publishing the concept of a standard clinic designed by UNK Project, which took second place in the competition organized by the Union of Architects of Russia in collaboration with the Healthcare Ministry.
From Foundation to Teaspoon
Based on the taste of their friendly clients, the architects Olga Budennaya and Roman Leonidov designed and built a house in the Moscow metropolitan area playing Art Nouveau. At the same time, they enriched the typology of a private house with modern functions of a garage loft and a children’s art studio.
Continuation and Development
The second “office” stage of Comcity, the most popular business park of the “New Moscow” area, continues the underground street of the already existing part of the complex, responding to its architectural identity.
​The Flying One
Expected to become an analogue of Moscow’s Skolkovo, the project of the High Park campus at Saint Petersburg’s ITMO University, designed by Studio 44, mesmerizes us with its sheer scale and the passion that the architects poured into it. Its core – the academic center – is interpreted as an avant-garde composition inspired by Piazza del Campo with a bell tower; the park is reminiscent of the “rays” of the main streets of Saint Petersburg, and, if watched from a birds-eye view, the whole complex looks like a motherboard with at least four processors on it. The design of the academic building even displays a few features of a sports arena. The project has a lot of meanings and allusions about it; all of them are united by plastique energy that the hadron collider itself could be jealous of.
​The Aperture Effect
For a housing complex built in the town of Pushkino in the Moscow metropolitan area, KPLN Architects designed facades that adjust the stream of light by using the wall geometry.
​A Comfortable City in Itself
The project that we are about to cover is seemingly impossible amidst human anthills, chaotically interspersed with old semi-neglected dachas. Meanwhile, the housing complex built on the Comcity business part does offer a comfortable environment of decent city: not excessively high-rise and moderately private as a version of the perfect modern urbanist solution.
Moving on the Edge
The housing complex “Litsa” (“Faces”) on Moscow’s Khodynka Field is one of the new grand-scale buildings that complement the construction around it. This particular building skillfully tackles the scale, subjugating it to the silhouette and the pattern; it also makes the most of the combination of a challenging land site and formidable square footage requirements, packing a whole number of features within one volume, so the house becomes an analogue of a city. And, to cap it all, it looks like a family that securely protects the children playing in the yard from... well, from everything, really.
Visual Stability Agent
A comparatively small house standing on the border of the Bolshevik Factory combines two diametrically opposite features: expensive materials and decorative character of Art Deco, and a wide-spaced, even somewhat brutal, facade grid that highlights a laminated attic.
The Faraday Cage
The project of the boutique apartment complex in the 1st Truzhenikov Lane is the architects’ attempt to squeeze a considerable volume into a tiny spot of land, at the same time making it look graceful and respectable. What came to their rescue was metal, stone, and curvilinear glass.
Color and Line
The new successful techniques developed by A.Len for designing a kindergarten under budget constraints: the mosaic of irregular windows and working with color.
The Union of Art and Technology
His interest for architecture of the 1930’s is pretty much the guiding star for Stepan Liphart. In his project of the “Amo” house on St. Petersburg’s Vasilyevsky Island, the architect based himself on Moscow Art Deco - aesthetically intricate and decorated in scratch-work technique. As a bonus, he developed the city block typology as an organic structure.
The Countdown
The project that Evgeniy Gerasimov and Partners developed for Moscow’s Leningrad Avenue: the tallest building in the company’s portfolio, continuing the tradition of Moscow’s Stalin architecture.
White Town
In the project that they developed for a southern region of Russia, OSA Architects use multilayered facades that create an image of seaside resort architecture, and, in the vein of the latest trends of today, mix up different social groups that the residents belong to.
​Just a Mirror for the Sun
The house that Sergey Skuratov designed in Nikolovorobinsky Alley is thought out down to the last detail. It adapts three historical facades, interprets a feeling of a complex city, is composed of many layers, and catches plenty of sunlight, from sunrises to sunsets. The architect himself believes that the main role of this house is creating a background for another nearby project of his, Art House in the Tessinsky Alley.
​Part of the Whole
On June 5, the winners of Moscow Architectural Award were announced. The winners list includes the project of a school in Troitsk for 2,100 students, with its own astronomy dome, IT testing ground, museum, and a greenhouse on the roof.
Pedagogical Architecture
Yet another project of a private school, in which Archimatika realizes the concept of aesthetic education and introduces a new tradition: combining Scandinavian and Soviet experience, turning to works of art, and implementing sustainable technologies.
​Rational Arrangement
In this article, we are examining a complex of buildings and interiors of the first stage of the project that has recently become extremely popular – the Kommunarka clinic.
​Parallel Universe
In the “Parallel House” residence that he designed in the Moscow metropolitan area, the architect Roman Leonidov created a dramatic sculptural composition from totally basic shapes – parallelepipeds, whose collision turned into an exciting show.
​Breakwater
In the Istra district of Moscow metropolitan area, the tandem of 4izmerenie and ARS-ST designed a sports complex – a monovolume that has the shape of a chamfered parallelepiped with a pointed “nose” like a ship’s bow.
​Stairway to Heaven
The project of a hotel in the settlement of Yantarny is an example of a new recreational complex typology, and a new format that unites the hotel, the business, and the cultural functions. All of this is complemented by 100% integration with nature.
​Cape of Good Hope
In this issue, we are showing all the seven projects that participated in a closed-door competition to create a concept for the headquarters of Gazprom Neft, as well as provide expert opinions on those projects.